.

Tag: chemistry

Science Comics: The Batman Versions

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Sources: unknown (although presumably a Bat Cave somewhere…)

Why Chemists Make Bad Drug Dealers #funny

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From Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal.

Periodic Table of Heavy Metals: Head Banging not Necessary

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Available at Pop Chart Arts

Look Mom, It’s carbon tetraflouride!

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Or you could call it Tetrafluoromethane. For more information on the flourocarbo (CF4), see this link.

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Cartoon source unknown. Via IFLS. Molecule image via Wikipedia.

Heat to Kinetic Energy Vintage Illustration

(a.k.a. It’s a New Year, so time to start things up again!)

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Illustration from “Our Friend the Atom” (1956 Walt Disney Book by Heinz Haber). Via Fresh Photons

Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza! – Day 23

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NERDY DIRTY CHRISTMAS
By Nicole Martinez

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(see more of Popperfont’s Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravanganza here)

Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza! – Day 15

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ANIMATED GIF OF A GROWING SNOWFLAKE
By Kenneth G. Libbrecht, via Snowcrystals.com

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(Worth the loading wait…)

(see more of Popperfont’s Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravanganza here)

Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza! – Day 14

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O CHEMISTRY GLASSWARE CHRISTMAS TREE, O CHEMISTRY GLASSWARE CHRISTMAS TREE

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Via ReSyn Biosciences, Avans University of Applied Sciences.

(see more of Popperfont’s Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravanganza here)

Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza! – Day 6

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AMAZING MACRO PHOTOGRAPHS OF SNOW CRYSTALS (GIANT SNOWFLAKES!)
By Andrew Osokin, via Colossal

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(see more of Popperfont’s Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravanganza here)

Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza! – Day 5

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SNOWMAN SCIENCE
Courtesy of Calvin and Hobbes, by Bill Watterson

Evolution

Paleosnowman
Sharks
anatomicallycorrect

snowflake

(see more of Popperfont’s Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravanganza here)

When you need to write the reactions for a chemical separation, and you’re stuck… #funny

Source unknown. Via IFLS.

Calendar that keeps track of the date by capillary action of the ink on the paper #whoa #amazing

Wow. This is pretty amazing…

“Ink Calendar” make use the timed pace of the ink spreading on the paper to indicate time. The ink is absorbed slowly, and the numbers in the calendar are “printed” daily. One a day, they are filled with ink until the end of the month. A calendar self-updated, which enhances the perception of time passing and not only signaling it.

By Oscar Diaz

Introducing Science Crayons!

By wethesciencey.com, via Etsy.

Did you hear about the guy who froze himself to absolute zero? He’s 0K now. #funny

This is so bad, that it’s good…

Giant Erlenmeyer Flask Inspires Giant Artwork.

Vancouver-based artist Bill Pechet of Pechet Studio has teamed up with lighting co-designer Chris Pekar of Lightworks and Montreal-based LED lighting manufacturer Lumenpulse to create one remarkable public art installation called Emptyful. The towering structure, which mimics a mammoth sized laboratory flask, stands 35-feet tall and 31-feet wide, weighing in at approximately 48,500 lbs. Located at Winnipeg’s Millennium Library Plaza, Pechet’s sculpture serves as a real crowd pleaser, grabbing the attention of visitors and casual pedestrians alike.

See Bill Pechet’s website and Lumenpulse’s website for more.

Graduated cylinder versus dropout cylinder #funny

Not sure what the original source is for this one (please leave a comment if you know).

Wedding seating chart uses Periodic Table of Elements motif. #awesome

This is so awesome, I can only barely justify how awesome it is!

Via IFLS.

Who knew Zinc Oxide could be so pretty?

“ZnO nanoparticles obtained by hydrothermal synthesis using microwave heating.” ~FR

“This [Zinc Oxide] semiconductor has several favorable properties, including good transparency, high electron mobility, wide bandgap, and strong room-temperature luminescence. Those properties are used in emerging applications for transparent electrodes in liquid crystal displays, in energy-saving or heat-protecting windows, and in electronics as thin-film transistors and light-emitting diodes.” (Wikipedia)

By Francisco Rangel, via Stacey Thinx.

Formaldehyde versus Casualdehyde #chemistry #funny

Now, I will never forget the structure…

Via IFLS

The Dark Knight Returns (After Sodium)

Source unknown.