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Tag: astronomy

Axis-tilt: is the reason for the season. #awesome

axistilt

Photo source unknown, via Fresh Photons

Awesome animated gifs of the Elephant Trunk Nebula.

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elephantstrunk02

elephantstrunk03

From Space Goat, original images by J-P Metsavainio

This solar corona, a la solar eclipse, is truly amazing!

(O.K. This designates my previous instagram post to the “I’m not worthy” category!)

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corona-1

corona-2

corona-3

By Miloslav Druckmüller, via Colossal

Quick! Assign the letters JHMLCNVTURISEYAPO to the integers -8 to 8 and tell me what you get…

… a piece of brilliant recreational math from Lee Sallows.

Specifically:

S + U + N = 3 + 0 – 3 = 0
M + E + R + C + U + R + Y = -6 + 4 + 1 – 4 + 0 + 1 + 5 = 1
V + E + N + U + S = -2 + 4 – 3 + 0 + 3 = 2
E + A + R + T + H = 4 + 6 + 1 – 1 – 7 = 3
M + A + R + S = – 6 + 6 + 1 + 3 = 4
J + U + P + I + T + E + R = -8 + 0 + 7 + 2 – 1 + 4 + 1 = 5
S + A + T + U + R + N = 3 + 6 – 1 + 0 + 1 – 3 = 6
U + R + A + N + U + S = 0 + 1 + 6 – 3 + 0 + 3 = 7
N + E + P + T + U + N + E = -3 + 4 + 7 – 1 + 0 – 3 + 4 = 8
P + L + U + T + O = 7 – 5 + 0 – 1 + 8 = 9
E + R + I + S* = 4 + 1 + 2 + 3 = 10

Via Futility Closet

I think we can all agree that nebulae are just pretty

nebula

That is: “A nebula (from Latin: “cloud”; pl. nebulae or nebulæ, with ligature or nebulas) is an interstellar cloud of dust, hydrogen, helium and other ionized gases.” (from Wikipedia)

Images compiled by Antony McAulay, via ScienceAlert

If you have some time to kill, you can even read up on a few of them…

Eagle Nebula, Carina Nebula, Cat’s Eye Nebula, Horsehead NebulaCrab Nebula, Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302), Eskimo Nebula, Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635), Cat’s Eye Nebula, Dumbbell Nebula, Helix Nebula, Hourglass Nebula, Medusa Nebula, Orion Nebula, Rosette Nebula, Tarantula Nebula, Trifid Nebula

Digitally manipulated stellar scapes by Chris Keegan. #whoa

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By Chris Keegan

What if the moon was one of the other planets in the solar system? What would it look like?

Pretty freaking cool actually…

moon1

The moon

mercury2

Mercury

venus0

Venus

mrs3

Mars

jupiter7

Jupiter

saturn6

Saturn

uranus5

Uranus

neptune4

Neptune

By Ron Miller, via My Modern Met.

A vintage look at life in our solar system

Awesome… and from 1939 by  Frank R. Paul,

Frank-R.-Paul-life-on-venus-600x809

8-Frank-R.-Paul-life-on-uranus-600x803

7-Frank-R.-Paul-life-on-saturn-600x802

6-Frank-R.-Paul-life-on-pluto-600x808

5-Frank-R.-Paul-life-on-neptun-600x809

4-Frank-R.-Paul-life-on-mercury-600x808

2-Frank-R.-Paul-life-on-moon-of-jupiter-600x808

1-Frank-R.-Paul-life_on_jupiter-600x810

3-Frank-R.-Paul-life-on-mars-600x801

Via Visual News

Some words of advice from @Cmdr_Hadfield drawn by @zenpencils

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Quote by Chris Hadfield, art by Gavin Aung Than.

Finally a reason to mount a blaster on Hubble: Hubble finds a Space Invader.

Do you see it?

spaceinvaderhubble

There it is…

hst_abell68_spaceinvader_568.jpg.CROP.original-original

From N. Rose (NASA & ESA.), via Bad Astronomy.

The sun is gorgeous? Yes, it is: especially when viewed under different wavelengths. #wow via @kejames

719689main1_Grid-Sun-670

manysuns

“Yellow-green light of 5500 Angstroms, for example, generally emanates from material of about 10,000 degrees F (5700 degrees C), which represents the surface of the sun. Extreme ultraviolet light of 94 Angstroms, on the other hand, comes from atoms that are about 11 million degrees F (6,300,000 degrees C) and is a good wavelength for looking at solar flares, which can reach such high temperatures. By examining pictures of the sun in a variety of wavelengths – as is done through such telescopes as NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) — scientists can track how particles and heat move through the sun’s atmosphere.”

Images and text from NASA, via @kejames.

Way cool astronaut bedsheets

astronautbedsheets01

astronautbedsheets02

From Snurk, via Thinx

Absolutely mesmerizing stop motion animation on the speed of the Earth’s rotation

SLOW DEREK from danojari on Vimeo.

Via Drawn.ca

The sun: it’s pretty and vaguely reminds me of SEM pictures of cellular things

Am I right?

sun-1

sun-2

By Alan Friedman, via Colossal

This is freaking brilliant. Jupiter Red Spot Embroidery.

jupiterembroidery

By pardalote, via Thinx

How an astronomer was honoured by mentioning his name without mentioning his name.

I love this. To do with these 8 asteroids, and explained in full at the always brilliant futility closet*.

1227 Geranium
1228 Scabiosa
1229 Tilia
1230 Riceia
1231 Auricula
1232 Cortusa
1233 Kobresia
1234 Elyna

*tagged here (without copying), in case you wish to find an interesting story under astronomy, science history, or scientist.

Interesting facts about Uranus. #funny

takingalookaturanus

Artist unknown. Via IFLS.

One of the earliest Mars images was a digitally reconstructed paint-by-numbers.

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“A “real-time data translator” machine converted a Mariner 4 digital image data into numbers printed on strips of paper. Too anxious to wait for the official processed image, employees from the Telecommunications Section at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, attached these strips side by side to a display panel and hand colored the numbers like a paint-by-numbers picture. The completed image was framed and presented to JPL director, William H. Pickering. Mariner 4 was launched on November 28, 1964 and journeyed for 228 days to the Red Planet, providing the first close-range images of Mars.”

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Close up (Dan Goods)

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Color Key (Spencer Mishlen)

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Side by side comparison of drawn image and actaul image (JPL/Caltech)

Text and images from NASA/JPL/Dan Goods, via Wired.

Vintage National Geographic Images

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Charles Bittinger, Eclipse of the Sun by the Earth, 1930s

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Vittorio Sella, A Cascade of Weathered Ice Spills From the 14 Square Mile Glacier, Karagour Glacier, Caucasus Mountains, Russia, 1910s

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Pierre Mion, Habitat in Space, 1970s

 

On display at the Steven Kasher Gallery until February 16th, 2013

Astronaut specific problems: Ending it all.

enditall

By Poorly Drawn Lines. Via IFLS.

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