How to eat a Triceratops: A visual guide

As Fowler and his colleagues examined the various types of bite mark on the skulls, they were intrigued by the extensive puncture and pull marks on the neck frills on some of the specimens. At first, this seemed to make no sense. “The frill would have been mostly bone and keratin,” says Fowler. “Not much to eat there.” The pulling action and the presence of deep parallel grooves led the team to realise that these marks were probably not indicative of actual eating, but repositioning of the prey. The scientists suggest that the frills were in the way of Tyrannosaurus as it was trying to get at the nutrient-rich neck muscles.

STEP 1: HOLD!

STEP 2: YANK!

STEP 3: PULL VIA NOSE!

STEP 4: ENJOY!

Article by Matt Kaplan in Nature. Research via Denver Fowler (and colleagues) at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana.