.

Tag: scientist

Enamored with this lovely drawing of a “scientist.”

thescientist

By Ben Marriott.

Stunning portrait of Darwin by @davidrevoy, as composed by a myriad of organisms

Wow. Very cool… How many organisms can you spot?

darwinportraitdavidrevoy

By David Revoy, via Fresh Photons.

If icons of science had Instagram accounts…

… then it might look like this:

darwininstagram

einsteininstagram

newtoninstagram

Via histagrams.

Testing Galileo’s idea IN SPACE!

This is so awesome…

This comes by way of the Futility Closet, which also outlines a really great thought experiment that convinced Galileo that he was right, and Aristotle was wrong (his was the prevailing theory at the time).

This is a wonderful & touching way to spend 7 minutes in science history joy: Wallace: The Other Guy to Discover Natural Selection

Beautifully done…

Via the New York Times.

So apparently, Sir Isaac Newton invented the cat door. Maybe.

Whilst doing a little research on our friend, Isaac Newton, I cam across this lovely piece of trivia. Long story short: on Wikipedia, you can go from “Pet Door” to “Isaac Newton” in one click.

In an apparent early modern example of urban legend, the invention of the pet door was attributed to Isaac Newton (1642–1727) in a story (authored anonymously and published in a column of anecdotes in 1893) to the effect that Newton foolishly made a large hole for his adult cat and a small one for her kittens, not realizing the kittens would follow the mother through the large one.[3] Two Newton biographers cite passages saying that Newton kept “neither cat nor dog in his chamber”.[4][5] Yet over 60 years earlier, a member of Newton’s social circles at Trinity, one J. M. F. Wright, reported this same story (from an unknown source) in his 1827 memoir, adding: “Whether this account be true or false, indisputably true is it that there are in the door to this day two plugged holes of the proper dimensions for the respective egresses of cat and kitten.”[6]

Text via Wikipedia.

Science themed toilet roll art (yes, it does exist) #remarkable

rouleaux-2

rouleaux-7

rouleaux-1

By Anastassia Elias, via Colossal

I love this art piece. “My Father Studied Geology” by Jensine Eckwall @WhoIsJensine

myfatherstudiedgeologysmaller_750

By Jensine Eckwall

Some words of advice from @Cmdr_Hadfield drawn by @zenpencils

2013-03-05-hadfield

Quote by Chris Hadfield, art by Gavin Aung Than.

The monument to Sir Isaac Newton that never came to be. #whoa

This would have been something else, if it came to pass.

2013-03-10-a-body-at-rest

“In an anonymous letter to the London Times in 1825, Thomas Steele of Magdalen College, Cambridge, proposed enshrining Isaac Newton’s residence in a stepped stone pyramid surmounted by a vast stone globe. The physicist himself had died more than a century earlier, in 1727, and lay in Westminster Abbey, but Steele felt that preserving his home would produce a monument ‘not unworthy of the nation and of his memory’”

Text and via Futility Closet.

How an astronomer was honoured by mentioning his name without mentioning his name.

I love this. To do with these 8 asteroids, and explained in full at the always brilliant futility closet*.

1227 Geranium
1228 Scabiosa
1229 Tilia
1230 Riceia
1231 Auricula
1232 Cortusa
1233 Kobresia
1234 Elyna

*tagged here (without copying), in case you wish to find an interesting story under astronomy, science history, or scientist.

Why Chemists Make Bad Drug Dealers #funny

chemistryfacultysellingdrugs

From Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal.

Lisa Congdon’s Wonderful Adventures in Hand Lettering – Science Edition.

DM-Wallpaper-1301-1024x768

day194_lowres2

day216_lowres1

day288_lowres

day336_lowres

By Lisa Congdon. Top one available as a desktop wallpaper.

Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza! – Day 19

day19

DARWIN AS SANTA (A.K.A. ONE WAY DARWIN COULD JUMP THE SHARK)
See other Ways Darwin Could Jump the Shark

santa_darwin

“Sporting his full white beard, Darwin is hired to impersonate Santa Claus at the local mall. He initially does well in this job, looking the part, being punctual, amicable, and knowledgeable about reindeer. However, he soon begins to insist on teaching children words like “invertebrate.” He also starts giving out stylish feces beads instead of candy canes. Later, he gets in an argument with another Santa Claus in another mall over biologically sound explanations for Rudolph’s glowing nose. The “Darwin vs. Santa Claus” fistfight goes viral on YouTube.”

By David Ng via McSweeney’s. Image: Source Unknown.

(see more of Popperfont’s Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravanganza here)

The “Name the Scientist: Cartoon Picture Edition” Quiz

How many can you get? (I got 6)

16_Scientists_Quiz_FULL_ChaygroundDOTcom
(Click on the image for a larger version).

By Chay Hawes. Answers found here.

Some quotes about climate change…

somequotesaboutclimatechange

By Bird and Moon, via IFLS.

Carl Sagan as a Scribblenaut

by Aaron Thornton, via Hey Oscar Wilde!

Graph: In which chocolate consumption strongly correlates with likelihood of getting a Nobel Prize.

Well… by way of the country the Nobel Laureate belongs to… (p.s. this is tongue in cheek, but good as a slide to talk about the old correlation versus causation issue)

Abstract:
“Dietary flavonoids, abundant in plant-based foods, have been shown to improve cognitive function. Specifically, a reduction in the risk of dementia, enhanced performance on some cognitive tests, and improved cognitive function in elderly patients with mild impairment have been associated with a regular intake of flavonoids. A subclass of flavonoids called flavanols, which are widely present in cocoa, green tea, red wine, and some fruits, seems to be effective in slowing down or even reversing the reductions in cognitive performance that occur with aging. Dietary flavanols have also been shown to improve endothelial function and to lower blood pressure by causing vasodilation in the peripheral vasculature and in the brain. Improved cognitive performance with the administration of a cocoa polyphenolic extract has even been reported in aged Wistar–Unilever rats.

Since chocolate consumption could hypothetically improve cognitive function not only in individuals but also in whole populations, I wondered whether there would be a correlation between a country’s level of chocolate consumption and its population’s cognitive function. To my knowledge, no data on overall national cognitive function are publicly available. Conceivably, however, the total number of Nobel laureates per capita could serve as a surrogate end point reflecting the proportion with superior cognitive function and thereby give us some measure of the overall cognitive function of a given country.”

By Franz H. Messerli, M.D. from Chocolate Consumption, Cognitive Function, and Nobel Laureates (October 10, 2012DOI: 10.1056/NEJMon1211064), via New England Journal of Medicine.

Just in case you’re the sort who wonders what an Einstein-Bowie hybrid might look like.

By Eddie Gomez, via Hey Oscar Wilde!

Newton, shoulders, giants and other things he may or may not have stood on during his lifetime.

By DAVID NG

Likely:

Grass.
A stage of some sort.
Guard.
Tippy toes.

Unlikely

Laminate Flooring
Astroturf.
Olympic podium.
Someone’s throat.

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