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Tag: microbiology

Paper craft microbial art. #beautiful

Whoa…

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By Rogan Brown, via Colossal.

Excellent TED talk by @edyong209 on the wonder that is the parasite host relationship (yes, I used the word “wonder.”)

I think this explains the weird relationship we have with LOL cats… (just watch the video)

By Ed Yong, via TED.

This is so awesome: Cross-stitched microbiology

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By Alicia Watkins, via Colossal (h/t to Ben Cohen)

Not flower arrangement, but DIATOM arrangement. Yes, it’s a thing.

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Microscope slides by (from top to bottom) A.L. Brigger, W.M. Grant, W.M. Grant., and R.F. Behan, via Colossal. More here.

Very very VERY detailed graphic of H1N1

H1N1

H1N12

By Visual Science, via Fresh Photons

I guess it might look like this if microbes were to suit up like Iron Man?

Or not.

But wow… Check out these stunning metal sculptures of microbes by Erick James. Currently on display at the Beaty Biodiversity Museum at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Until January 5th).

Trichonympha

Trichonympha

Trichomitopsis1

Trichomitopsis

Didinium1

Didinium

Dinoflagellate

Dinoflagellate

Euglena1

Euglena

By Erick James. Via Beaty Biodiversity Museum

Lovely animated gif of some sort of protist. #beautiful

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From gifovea, via Fresh Photons.

See, you CAN use mycology in good product design. The brilliant anti-theft lunch bag.

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From the. (and unfortunately sold out)

This is cool. Pyrocystis fusiformis night light in the shape of a dinosaur.

Interesting Kickstarter campaign by Yonder Biology. More info here.

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Cell as a Death Star like entity (with mini virus spaceship in the mix). Awesome science illustration by Glen McBeth

* I wonder if he’s illustrated a card game before… (We do have a Darwin themed deck to work on)

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By Glen McBeth (also check out his awesome blog).

All hail the mighty phage! #greatillustration

“BATTLING THE BACTERIOPHAGE” BY ANDREW KOLB

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Via Fresh Photons

Science things that are awesome…

(Also, all of these goofy pics are now being archived at a tumblr I just set up – scienceisawesomethatisall.tumblr.com)

votingisawesome

O.K. Yesterday was our provincial elections (in British Columbia), and in the end, the Liberal party came out winning. There’s quite a few environmental issues that are in the forefront in my neck of the woods, not the least of which concerns the Northern Gateway pipeline.

The Liberals didn’t actually have the greatest platform on this (at least from an environmental or science policy standpoint), but here’s hoping the public continues to pressure them to do the “best” (re: what scientific expert peer review suggests) thing for the province, and indeed the planet at large.

hydrasareawesome

Last Saturday, my lab opened up the entire ground floor of the Michael Smith Building to the public. This was in conjunction with Science Rendezvous, a cross Canada science festival, and in the case of UBC, organized by the Faculty of Science. In the house (so to speak) were folks from the Beaty Museum, Civil Engineering, Pathology, Physics and Astronomy, as well as the Engineering Physics Robotics lab (who also brought in their 3D printers). We also used the building as ground zero for a number of tours throughout campus.

All in all, a great day (and busy too!). In my space, I actually brought out about a dozen or dissecting scopes and collected a nice jar of pond scum. Kids (and their parents), with some basic instructions, were let loose to find whatever they could find in the pond water. Lots of cooties were found, protozoa and algae abound, but my favourite was this Hydra that I managed to get a decent picture of on my iPhone.

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The scientific method – it’s not perfect, but it’s pretty much the best way out there on collecting your thoughts and information to make sound decisions. All the more so, if the decision is high stakes IMHO.

Alright, how much fun would a course called “Felt Microbiology 101″ be?

Especially, if you get to play with creations like the below (a giant euglena, giant amoeba, and giant daphnia)

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By Hiné Mizushima, via Thinx

On microbiology and good parenting. #funny

microbiologygoodversuseffectiveparenting

From Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal, via IFLS.

Turns out the petri plate makes for a very nice canvas.

Not technically microbial art (which would have been very very impressive), but still pretty cool nevertheless…

dailydish

By Klari Reis, via NotCot.org

The serenity of the microscopic world as captured with animated gifs #beautiful

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Images from Clemens Wirth, gifs by microscopicexpressionism, via Fresh Photons

Science Comics: The Batman Versions

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Sources: unknown (although presumably a Bat Cave somewhere…)

If cells could be character actors.

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By Mahendra Nazar, via Thinx

Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza! – Day 17

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AWESOME MICROBIAL CHRISTMAS ART!
 Fungal plates by Stephanie MounaudBacterial plates by Niall Hamilton.

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Fungal Christmas tree. Top: Talaromyces stipitatus; Tree: Aspergillus nidulans; Ornaments: Penicillium marneffei; Trunk: Aspergillus terreus.

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fungal-snowman

Fungal snowman. Hat, Eyes, Mouth, Buttons: Aspergillus niger; Arms: Aspergillus nidulans; Nose: Aspergillus terreus with Penicillium marneffei; Body: Neosartorya

(see more of Popperfont’s Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravanganza here)

Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravaganza – Day 3

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DIY: HOW TO MAKE A TERRARIUM CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT!
Full details at Inhabitat.com

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“Materials required: Moss, plants and/or twigs small enough to fit into your terrarium ornament – Some soil – Tweezers – Reusable glass ornament orb – A ribbon (we used one from an old gift box) – A chain or string (we used an old bracelet) – (optional) Figurines or other fun tsotchkes to place inside your ornament”

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Full instructions at inhabitat.com.

(see more of Popperfont’s Sciencegeek Advent Calendar Extravanganza here)

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